John R. Kleinpeter has practiced graphic design since 1982 and has been an educator since 2001. His research interests include graphic design in history, culture and the built environment.

(See my biography page for more information).


Publications:
Form Over Function for David Carson: From Controversy to Acclaim

Graphic Designer David Carson blurred the boundaries between typographic form and communication. His divergence from established Modernist typographic practices marked a turning point in design history.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Article: Electronic

$US5.00
Typographic Innovation and Negative Criticism: A Retrospective from Gutenberg to Carson

A retropsective search of graphic design history reveals a chain of innovators who were negatively criticized at the time of the innovation, then later recognized for their contribution.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Article: Electronic

$US5.00
Old Places with New Faces: Considerations for Integrating Environmental Graphic Design into Repurposed Historical Contexts

A discovery of design practices used to develop an environmental graphic design program for a new use at a structure or site of historical significance.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Article: Electronic

$US5.00
Style Mimicry at Los Angeles Union Station: A Case Study of Environmental Graphic Design in a Historical Context

This case study delineates the design process used to incorporate new environmental graphic design work into the renovation of a structure listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Article: Electronic

$US5.00
Respectful Style at Mainstreet Theatre, Kansas City, Missouri, USA: A Case Study of Environmental Graphic Design in a Historical Context

An Environmental Graphic Design program for the restored AMC Mainstreet Theatre blends the characteristics of the site with new technologies in a respectful style that honors the historical structure.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Article: Electronic

$US5.00
Students’ Perceptions and Attitudes upon Enrollment in an Undergraduate Hybrid Design Course

This article describes thirty-six undergraduate, full-time, design students’ responses to a qualitative survey upon enrolling in a hybrid course in visual communication for environments. Results and implications will be discussed.

Article: Print

$US10.00

Published online: June 14, 2017

$US5.00